Tag Archives: NIAS

Nuclear India: Revisiting Issues, Challenges and Threats

NIAS – Christ University Workshop, 24 August 2017

The International Strategic and Security Studies Programme (ISSSP) at the National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), in collaboration with the Department of International Studies and History, Christ University, organised a workshop titled “Nuclear India: Revisiting issues, challenges and threats” on 24 August 2017.

 

To read the entire event report click here

India and Space in Current Context | Dr. M Annadurai – Keynote Address at 2016 Indo-US Dialogue

Dr. M. Annadurai, Director, ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore delivered the Keynote Address on October 5, 2016 at the India-US Cooperation on Global Security: Dialogue on Strategic Security Threats of the 21st Century at NIAS Bangalore. Dr. Annadurai spoke on Indian space capabilities and the space situational awareness in the current context. 

 



 

 

India-US Cooperation on Global Security: Dialogue on Strategic Security Threats of the 21st Century

The National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore and the National Academies of Sciences, United States held the Indo-US dialogue on Strategic Security Threats of the 21st Century between October 5-7, 2016. The  dialogue was held at the JRD Tata Auditorium, NIAS Bangalore.

Click here for the programe of the Indo-US Dialogue.

 

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Public Lecture: Prof Matthew Bunn on Evolving Opportunities for Cooperation in Nuclear Security

Professor Matthew Bunn

Professor of Practice, Harvard University

delivered a Public Lecture on October 6, 2016 on the topic

Evolving Opportunities for Cooperation in Nuclear Security

 

dsc_8979About the Speaker: Matthew Bunn is a Professor of Practice at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. His research interests include nuclear theft and terrorism; nuclear proliferation and measures to control it; the future of nuclear energy and its fuel cycle; and policies to promote innovation in energy technologies. He has played major role in the formulation of U.S. policies related to the control and disposition of weapons-usable nuclear materials in the United States and the former Soviet Union.

 

Conference Report: Armed Conflict, Peace Audit and Early Warning

NIAS-KAS Conference on “Armed Conflict, Peace Audit & Early Warning: Decennial Review 2016”

J.R.D. Tata Auditorium, NIAS, June 9-11, 2016

ACSA Event CoverInternational Strategic and Security Studies Programme (ISSSP), National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), Bangalore organized a conference on June 9-11, 2016. The conference analysed armed conflicts and peace processes in the region during the last ten years. Leading scholars, former practitioners and media professionals took part in the three-day conference held at NIAS campus in Bangalore.

The focus of discussions included Afghanistan, Pakistan, multiple conflicts and peace processes within India (J&K, Northeast and Naxal), Nepal, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and Maldives. The findings are likely to be published in early 2017. The conference was organised by the NIAS in collaboration with the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung (KAS).

The event report has been prepared by Adarsh Vijay, Albertina Nithya B, Anu Abraham, Nazrin Hussain, Sanjal Shastri & Sourina Bej.

To read the entire event report click here

Looking East to Act East: Issues and Challenges in India’s Foreign Policy

Department of Southeast and East Asia, University of Calcutta, March 9, 2016

M. Mayilvaganan, Assistant Professor, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore

Prakash Panneerselvam, Post Doctoral Associate, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore

The International Strategic and Security Studies Programme (ISSSP), National Institute of Advanced Studies NIAS) is co-organising a workshop on “Looking East to Act East: Issues and Challenges in India’s Foreign Policy.” The Workshop is being jointly organised by the University of Calcutta, National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), Maulana Abul Kalam Azad Institute of Asian Studies (MAKAIAS), and Observer Research Foundatiion (ORF) Kolkata Chapter, at the Department of Southeast and East Asia, University of Calcutta, March 9, 2016.

Dr. Mayilvaganan will be presenting a paper on the topic “India in Southeast Asia: Assessment of India’s Image and Role – A Case Study of Myanmar and Malaysia.”

Dr. Panneerselvam will be presenting a paper on the topic “Japan’s Interest and Role in Asia.”

Strengthening Intelligence Gathering, Surveillance and Reconnaissance are of Vital Importance

National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS)

International Strategic and Security Studies Programme (ISSSP)

Press Release – For Immediate Release

“Strengthening Intelligence Gathering, Surveillance and Reconnaissance are of Vital Importance”

The International Strategic and Security Studies Programme (ISSSP), a unique programme at the National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS) in IISc campus released four related reports on Small Satellites, Space War and Identification of Uranium Mill sites.

The four reports were released today by Dr Baldev Raj, Director of the NIAS and critiqued by Prof YS Rajan and Vice Admiral RN Ganesh. Introducing the reports, Prof Rajaram Nagappa highlighted the focus of them and their utmost importance to India’s national security. Dr Baldev Raj releasing the reports underlined the importance of the National Institute of Advanced Studies based in Bangalore but providing vital inputs and concrete recommendations to India’s security. He mentioned with pride that the NIAS is truly interdisciplinary and a cradle of good research work.

L to R (Dr. YS Rajan, Prof S. Chandrashekar, Prof Baldev Raj, Prof Rajaram Nagappa, Prof. Lalitha Sundaresan)

L to R: Dr. YS Rajan, Prof. S. Chandrashekar, Prof. Baldev Raj, Prof. Rajaram Nagappa, Prof. Lalitha Sundaresan

Dr Baldev Raj also reminded the primary objective of the NIAS founded by Dr Raja Ramanna and JRD Tata – in terms of engaging in a larger debate within and outside. “These reports are a part of that dialogue” underlined Dr Raj. He said, he has always always been fascinated by the ISSSP; he appreciated its scholars undertaking independent research work and also being successful in working together

The report titled “The Promise of Small Satellites for National Security,” authored by Prof Rajaram Nagappa provides a survey of small satellites that can be employed for military ISR requirements. The report also examines satellite and launch history of ISRO and concludes while ISRO has demonstrated technological capabilities, there is a lack of capacity in the country to meet the military space requirements. The report also carries a survey of small satellite launch vehicles and determines a launch vehicle capable of placing a small satellite of 350 kg mass in an orbit around 500 km can be configured using available rocket/missile stages in the country. The advantage of using readily available and flight-qualified stages is that the development time can be effectively reduced. For generating a faster turn around of the small satellite launch vehicle and satellites, increased industry involvement is essential.

Vice Admiral Ganesh commenting on the report said, “despite the constraints, the ISRO has gone ahead and undertaken a commendable job relating to both satellites and rockets.” According to him, the primary military requirement is for communications – imagery, surveillance, electronic warfare etc.

According to the report, one needs more frequent revisits, especially as mobile platforms like ships and other transport systems may have to be tracked.  As one would like to track such objects at night or under cloud cover conditions, one has to use optical imaging satellites as well as radar imaging satellites to get good imagery under all conditions. Electronic intelligence satellites (ELINTs) have antenna arrays to monitor electrical radiation from emitting sources. This will help in locating such sources (ships, radar stations and other such installations). The report also stresses the importance of technology. Nano-satellites in the mass range of 1-10 kg or micro-satellites in the mass range 10-100 kg or small satellites 100-1000 kg can be designed and employed for such applications. Small satellites will perhaps be more suited for the purpose of ELINT, optical and radar imaging to meet the 24×7 ISR requirements. A constellation of 15-18 satellites will be required. More satellites in the constellation can further reduce the time gap between revisits.

The second report titled “Space, War and Security: A Strategy for India” authored by Prof S Chandrashekar, presents a critical appraisal of Indian capabilities to monitor and use the space environment for various military tasks. These include Command & Control, Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance as well as a number of other space functions such as navigation and weather services. It makes a strong case for a new strategy that integrates these components into a coherent national strategy that is relevant for the country at this point in time. The formulation and implementation of such a strategy will also need a significant enhancement in capabilities to build and launch satellites. These are identified in some detail. India also needs a significant augmentation of its ground based radar and optical tracking facilities in order to monitor the happenings in space on a real time basis. Finally the report addresses the need to re-organize and restructure our entire national security complex to be aligned to this new global reality.

Two more reports, titled “Identification of Uranium Mill sites from Open Source satellite Images” & “Estimating Uranium Mill Capacity Using Satellite Pictures” authored jointly by S. Chandrashekar, Lalitha Sundaresan &  Bhupendra Jassani focus on the use of openly available satellite imagery for the identification of Uranium mills.

Its authors explained “using a sample of known Uranium mills from across the world a set of keys has been derived. These keys link observables in the satellite image (Google Earth image) with equipment and materials related to the processing of Uranium ore. Based on these features and their sequencing in the process a step by step algorithm for the identification of a Uranium mill has been worked out.”

Book Discussion: Why India is not a Great Power (Yet)

National Institute of Advanced Studies

Indian Institute of Science Campus, Bengaluru-560012

International Strategic and Security Studies Programme

and

The Takshashila Institution, Bengaluru

Invite you to a

BOOK DISCUSSION

of

Why India is not a Great Power (Yet) authored by Bharat Karnad

Karnad Book Image

The Book will be discussed by

  • Bharat Karnad, Professor, Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi
  • Nitin Pai, Director, The Takshashila Institution
  • S. Chandrashekar, J.R.D. Tata Visiting Professor, National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS)

Date: Friday, 9 October 2015

Time: 4:30 pm
Coffee/Tea will be served at 4:00 pm

Venue: Lecture Hall, NIAS, IISc Campus, Bangalore-12

About the Author: Bharat Karnad is Professor of National Security Studies, Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi, India. One of the foremost Indian national security strategists, he has been a member of the National Security Advisory Board, the Nuclear Doctrine Drafting Group and Adviser, Defence Expenditure, (10th) Finance Commission, India.

All are cordially invited

NIAS IPCS Young Scholars ‘Global Nuclear Politics and Strategy’ Workshop

NIAS IPCS Young Scholars Workshop on “Global Nuclear Politics and Strategy”

May 3-7, 2015, NIAS JRD Tata Auditorium, Bangalore

The Annual Residential Young Scholars’ Workshop (YSW), a flagship programme of the Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies, provides a unique opportunity to students and young professionals to gain meaningful insight into the field of nuclear studies.

This year’s edition – Global Nuclear Politics and Strategy 2015 – the workshop was jointly organised by the IPCS and the National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), Bangalore.

group photo

Group Photo of Speakers and Participants at NIAS-IPCS Young Scholars Workshop (May 4-7, 2015)

An unprecedented number of applications for GNPS 2015, making the competition keen and our task difficult, and the participant selection came in recognition of their academic and professional achievements. In addition to scholars from academic institutions and think-tanks across India, this year witnessed, for the first time, participation from young officers hailing from, among others, the Indian Army, Air Force, Border Security Force, DRDO and the Ministry of External Affairs.

The complete Workshop Schedule and Conference Booklet can be downloaded by clicking the links.

The presentations made by the speakers at the Workshop can be accessed below. 

Prof Sahni Presentation

Varun Sahni – Contemporary Global Nuclear Politics

Varun Sahni - International Arms Control, Non Prolif, Export Control Regimes

Varun Sahni – International Arms Control, Non Prolif, Export Control Regimes

LV Krishnan - Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle

LV Krishnan – Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle

LV Krishnan - Nuclear Safety

LV Krishnan – Nuclear Safety

Vijay Shankar - Evolution of Nuclear Strategy and Doctrine

Vijay Shankar – Evolution of Nuclear Strategy and Doctrine

S Chandrashekar - Evolution of Global Nuclear Capabilities

S Chandrashekar – Evolution of Global Nuclear Capabilities

Vijay Shankar - Nuclear Weapons in China's National Strategy

Vijay Shankar – Nuclear Weapons in China National Strategy

Manpreet Sethi - Nuclear Weapons and India's National Sec Strategy

Manpreet Sethi – Nuclear Weapons and India’s National Sec Strategy

S Chandrashekar - Cuban Missile Crisis

S Chandrashekar – Cuban Missile Crisis

Rajaram Nagappa - Introduction to Missiles

Rajaram Nagappa – Introduction to Missiles

A R Sundararajan - India's Nuclear Regulatory Framework

A R Sundararajan – India’s Nuclear Regulatory Framework

Baldev Raj - Nuclear Energy after Major Accidents

Baldev Raj – Nuclear Energy after Major Accidents

 

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NIAS-IPCS Young Scholars Workshop May 2015 – Storified

A recap of the NIAS-IPCS Young Scholars Workshop held at NIAS, Bangalore between May 4-7, 2015. To view the complete story via Storify click here

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